GENERAL SUBMISSIONS

Online submissions require a $3 processing fee, with an exception for current subscribers and past contributors to The Georgia Review, who may submit online at no cost. Subscribers and contributors: Please email garev@uga.edu to receive a link to submit for free, providing the genre of the work to be submitted and your full name and address (including zip code).

Submissions should be limited to one story, one essay, one review, or up to five poems. All prose manuscripts must be double spaced. Visual art may be uploaded in a single file or in multiples depending on the artist's needs. 

Please title your file with your last name (ex. Smith.docx), and include your name, address, and email address on the first page of your submission.

 

Work previously published in any form will not be considered. Please let us know in your cover letter if your submission is simultaneously being considered elsewhere, and likewise please notify us if any part of your submission is known to be included in a book already accepted by a publisher (including the anticipated date of book publication). 

If your work is accepted elsewhere, please let us know immediately by withdrawing your submission. If you need to withdraw a poem from a poetry submission, please contact us here, selecting "Submissions" in the drop-down menu.

THE LORAINE WILLIAMS POETRY PRIZE

The Georgia Review is pleased to announce the seventh annual Loraine Williams Poetry Prize. The winner will receive $1,000 and publication in our Spring 2020 issue for a single poem, never before published either in print or online.

The submission period runs April 1, 2019 through May 15, 2019, with the winning poem to be announced on August 15, 2019.
The Georgia Review thanks the late Loraine Williams for her sponsorship of this prize. Ms. Williams was a longtime Atlanta-based patron of the arts.

Thank you for sending us your work!    


Ends on May 15, 2019$3.00
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Please submit only one story. 

We have no standard submission length; we have published stories ranging in length from less than one of our pages to more than sixty. Ordinarily we do not publish novel excerpts, and we strongly discourage authors from submitting these.
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Please submit a single document containing three to five poems. 


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Please submit only one essay.

We are seeking informed essays that attempt to place their subjects against a broad perspective. For the most part we are not interested in scholarly articles that are narrow in focus and/or overly burdened with footnotes. The ideal essay for The Georgia Review is a provocative, thesis-oriented work that can engage both the general reader and the specialist.
We publish full-color reproductions of a wide range of artwork: paintings, photography, sculpture, woodcuts, ink drawings, and more. Usually we feature one work each on the front and back cover plus an interior layout of eight to twelve additional works; our preference is for groupings that display an engaging variety within some overall thematic unity. Submissions should include fifteen to twenty images.





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In most cases, selection of titles to be reviewed and assignments to specific reviewers are made by the editors. However, we certainly welcome submissions from outside reviewers—but we request that these submissions not be simultaneous.

In addition to standard reviews (3–5 double-spaced pages) and book briefs (maximum length 2 double-spaced pages), both of which usually focus on only one book, we also publish essay-reviews. An essay-review is almost always a discussion of more than one book, and it should develop a strong thesis that not only links the books under consideration but also reaches out to comment on literature or culture beyond the texts at hand. Typical essay-reviews run 2–4 double-spaced pages per book reviewed. 


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In most cases, interview assignments are made by the editors. However, we certainly welcome submissions from outside interviewers.

Please include in your submission title the name of the person interviewed.  
The Georgia Review